Category Archives: interesting

Quote of the day… on how to judge people

Being Dr. House for a day

 

Dr. Gregory House

Today’s Daily Prompt asks: If you could be a famous person for a day, who would you be? Why?

If I could choose to become a famous person, I would be Dr. Gregory House. Not Hugh Laurie (the actor who played the maverick doctor), but the actual character, Dr. House. I love how intelligent he is. The way he approaches his job can be seen as extremely risky, but I admire his confidence. He is not afraid to do and say anything that may offend others. He does almost everything in his own terms. He has a brilliant, yet erratic mind. He believes he is right all the time (like all of us) and he would go to extreme measures to prove others wrong.

I am aware of how busy Dr. House’s day would be, but I don’t mind spending a day being him. I guess I would like the freedom that he earned from being such a genius. I would enjoy that day despite being dosed up on vicodin. I may even enjoy insulting my colleagues!!

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PINGBACKS:

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angloswiss-chronicles

meaningunfolding

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Daily Prompt: Pick Your Gadget

Daily Prompt: Your local electronic store has just started selling ‘Time Machines’, ‘Anywhere Doors’ and ‘Invisibility Helmets’. You can only afford one. Which one of these would you buy and why?

Why can I only afford one? Darn!! In this fictitious scenario, why can”t I have unlimited money?

If I had to choose between the three items mentioned above, I would pick an Anywhere Door. Wouldn’t it be nice to travel anywhere in the world (or in space, for that matter) in a heartbeat? I would be able to visit my friends and family all over the world anytime I want. I can have an espresso in Venice, then stroll around Paris, have some gumbo in New Orleans, relax by a beach in the Carribean before coming back home. Well, actually, I woulldn’t have to call any particular place ‘home’. I could finally become a citizen of the world.

Using an ‘Anywhere Door’, I could finally go to the moon and other planets. I could perhaps see if there really is a heaven and/ or a hell.

The list of possibilities is endless!!

What did the others pick? Let’s find out:

Daily Prompt

tornin2

Cater it Forward

All things cute and beautiful

Kate Murray

Imagine immortality

Life – Glass Half Full

Life is great

Chronicles of an Anglo-Swiss

Jayne’s Daily Post

Annelfwind

Sue’s trifles

Journeyman

Manchester Science Festival 2013 photo gallery

BRAINS: Mind as Matter:

Gigantic Graphene model:

Ice Lab:

Eye & I:

 

Brian Bits:

PIg’s brain Dissection:

Brain Bits: Research, Demonstrations and Dissection

In another one of my exploits at Manchester’s Museum of Science and Insdustry last week, I stumbled upon the ‘Brain Bits’ event. This is another great event brought about by the fabulous organisers of this year’s Science Festival, which drew to a close yesterday. In ‘Brain Bits’, various researchers set up stalls at the top floor of the museum to talk about their research and/ or products to the public. As seen on the pictures below, these people talked about topics such as Alzheimer’s disease, vision, motor skills and coordination, seizures, and more. They explained, based on current research findings, which mostly were their own, how diseases spread, develop and can be slowed down. One group of researchers actually invited the public to take part in their experiment which looked at motor skills in flies (the actual names of which escapes me!). Some also presented fascinating equipments used in brain surgery.

As a psychology graduate and a neuroscience enthusiast, I have been impressed at how these researchers and volunteeers have been able to explain their topics in ways that were accessible to everyone. As it was a free public event, the audience were of mixed ages, gender and educational background. To be able to get most of them engaged and excited is not an easy feat, but the presenters managed just fine. Here are some pictures:

Equipment to aid brain surgeons during surgery that uses MRI and CT Scan techniques:

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IMG_0921Demonstration of how to drill holes in the skull (using a model, of course!):

IMG_0937Explaining the similarities and differences of brains across species:

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IMG_0922(From the left) Brains of a pig a rat and a mouse:

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Evidence of my participation in an experiment investigating motor skills :
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Researcher entering my data:
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Here are the other presentations and interactive activities:
For me, the most exciting part of the afternoon was when I got the chance to dissect an actual pig’s brain. Guided by Professor Stuart Allan of the University of Manchester, fellow attendees and I sliced and examined pigs’ brains in the laboratory. While we were doing so, Stuart explained to us the significance of each part of the brain was. What was also amazing is that pigs’ brains are structurally mostly the same as ours. Both human and pigs’ brains have two hemispheres (left and right), corpus callosums (the part that connects both hemispheres), brain stem and cerebellum. They differ, amongst other things, is the size of the frontal cortex (with ours being signifficantly bigger). Stuart also welcomed questions from the participants, who asked him interesting questions such as ‘whether there is a sense for gravity?’ The whole experience was educational, fascinating, unique and fun. Not only did it shed a better light in understanding the brain, but by bringing the science out to the public, it offered more chances of inspiring people (both young and old) to get into science.