Tag Archives: buddhism

Reason to Believe: Mindfulness (Daily Post)

Are you aware that you are breathing? If so, can you feel each and every breath?

That is enough reason for you to believe that you are alive.

That there is enough energy for you to do something.

 

You can read this, right? I know you can.

You understand what I am writing (hopefully).

Reading and surfing the net is easy enough for you.

Those are enough reason for you to believe in knowledge- your own knowledge.

 

You can see and you can move

however minimal, you still can.

Can you hear? Can you communicate (verbal or otherwise)?

If you can, be grateful. Those are enough to believe in yourself.

 

Pay attention to what you can do;

Not on what you cannot.

You’ll realise how great a person you are.

Believe in yourself, then others will believe in you.

 

Just remember:

You can. Yes, you!

We all can!

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In response to Daily Prompt – Reason To Believe

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A better way to be an Atheist?

As a person who does not believe in a deity, I often refuse to be called an Atheist due to the negative connotations that people attach to the term. I may be wrong but based on the conversations I have with other people, particularly those who are religious, athieists are often conceived of as people who hate religions and religious people because of their beliefs.

As someone who subscribes to the scientific methodology, I do not believe in any gods or spirits but I  do not hate the people who believe in a god or are members of any religion. From my experiences of being around religious people (I was raised as a Catholic and now work with Jewish people), I have seen the benefits of having a religious belief. For instance, being a follower of any religious faith gives one a sense of belonging- they often feel that they are a part of a tight-knit community that shares the same beliefs. Religions also teach people how to be kind to one another, to forgive each other and to love one another.

Positive aspects of different religions were described in greater detail by the philosopher Alain de Botton in his book, ‘Religion for Atheists’. An atheist himself, Alain was interested in how religious beliefs and teachings can help believers and non-believers alike, to live a better life. In this book, he argued that every religion has something positive to offer and that we should not shy away from adopting these beliefs into our own lives.

Here’s Alain explaining the book in more detail:

 

As Alain explained, this book might offend the strictly religious since it implies that it is healthy to ‘cherry-pick’ doctrines and teachings that suit one’s own personal set of belief system. Therefore, I recommend this book to anyone with an open mind. Please read this book!!!